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Nepal seeks recognation of six more eight thousanders

Nepal Mountaineering Association is asking for recognition of six more eight thousanders from Nepal at the meeting of the Himalaya host countries this April.

Last October, the association had submitted a similar proposal to the International Mountaineering and Climbing Federation that has not yet decided. The six peaks – Yalung Khang, West Yalung Khang, Kanchanjunga Central, Kanchanjunga South, Lhotse Middle and Lhotse Shar – are the ones that have been sought eight-thousander status are on the Nepal-India and Nepal-China borders.

There are 14 peaks above 8,000 metres in the world, all of them are in Asia.

Among them, eight including Mt Everest (8,848 m), Mt Kanchanjunga (8,586 m), Mt Lhotse (8,516 m), Mt Makalu (8,463 m), Mt Cho Oyu (8,201 m), Mt Dhaulagiri (8,167 m), Mt Manaslu (8,163 m) and Mt Annapurna I (8,091 m) are in Nepal.

Meanwhile, the government is planning to make it mandatory for mountaineers attempting to climb Mt Everest and other peaks above 8,000 m to take a high-altitude local guide or support staff to ensure their safety.

The proposal will be tabled at the joint meeting of the Himalaya host countries Nepal, India, China and Pakistan. The meeting is going to be held on April 18 in Kathmandu.

According to the proposed plan, climbing expeditions will have to hire two local guides for every two mountaineers for peaks above 8,000 metres and one local guide for every three climbers for peaks above 7,000 metres. Likewise, expeditions will be required to hire a local guide for peaks below 7,000 metres.

The meeting will also discuss some climbing rules and regulations, procedures including proper management of cross-border Himalayas and environment issues.

As a number of mountaineers have been reported to have been facing problems like high altitude sickness, a guide might be of great help as they are well aware of the geography and strong enough to handle risks in high altitude zones.

Last year, 678 climbers obtained climbing permits for Everest, and among them, 567 succeeded in reaching the top of the world’s highest peak, according to the tourism ministry that earned $3.16 million in Mt Everest royalties.

According to the stats, 4,411 people have climbed Mt Everest since the first ascent in 1953. Nearly 250 have died on its slopes.